Bowl-ing downhill

Print


Down “the Hill” resides a place of creativity, brilliance and energy — the Bryant Arts Center, which is just a couple of years old (in its current state, at least). I fear too few have ventured down to explore this wondrous other-world at Denison. My first visit there was Friday night, Oct. 22, to take part in the annual Bowl-A-Thon.

At the Bowl-A-Thon, sponsored by the DU Art Collective and Department of Studio Art, artists and amateurs design and create ceramic bowls to be sold at a later date, complete with some delicious soup. The sale’s proceeds go to the Licking County Food Pantry.

I corralled a few friends, and we trail-blazed our way down to see what the Art Collective had in store at their “12-hour bowl-making extravaganza.” As we approached Bryant Arts, I was awestruck by the beauty and enormity of the building, and I half imagined we’d find a lavish display of bowls and a throng of enraptured bystanders.

Instead, we found a single sign, directing us down two floors to a simple spread of pizza and soda. A representative from the Art Collective guided us through the various rooms where bowls were being made and explained the different construction techniques—throwing on a pottery wheel, pouring liquid clay into a mold, making coils of clay and wrapping them on top of each other, etc.

The bowl-makers were incredibly engaged, both in their work and in socializing with others. They were students, faculty, and residents of Granville, and their amalgam not only made for interesting conversations, but also showed the impressive depth of the Denison community.

The whole event was fun and constructive. First-year student Leah Polster said, “I had a great Friday night. I had a lot of fun and it was for a good cause.” Other conversations with participants all came back to the same theme: it was an outstanding event that enriched all involved—the campus, the town, and those who depend on the food pantry.

What do you think? Post a comment below...

  (Address will not be made public)

Comment Policy

No Comments Yet

TheDen Archives