Novel ink

Drew Johnson ’14

Other Exhibitions at the Denison Museum:

DRUCKWORKS: 40 Years of Books and Projects by Johanna Drucker
A distinguished writer, typographic poet, and scholar-critic, Drucker is a prolific creative artist with more than four dozen editioned artist’s books to her credit. The DRUCKWORKS retrospective allows audiences to experience the course of her artistic development and offers insights into the evolution of the field of artists’ books.

Book + Art: The Reading Room
This exhibition features books by several Ohio artists and is the result of sabbatical research conducted by Heather Lyle, Denison University archivist.

Graphix zines
In this exhibition, gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and queer (GLBTQ) artists and art movements are the subject of zines created by students in a course offered by Ron Abram, associate professor of art. Zines, short for fanzines or magazines, are short works that are self-published in either digital or print form.

Drew Johnson, a Spanish and communication double major and studio art minor, discovered something new about himself during his Introduction to Printmaking class.

“When I paint and draw, I try to present images that will be visually appealing to other people,” the junior from Chaska, Minn., says. “With printmaking, I feel I can talk about what interests me more than what will be attractive to others.”

The class, taught by Melissa Vogley-Woods, a visiting professor who specializes in printmaking, challenges students to investigate concepts of place, memory, environment and identity by creating “artist’s books.”

“Each book includes a variety of techniques, including mono-print, dry-point, screen printing, woodcut, letter press, linoleum cuts, collagraphs, rubbings, transfer and stencils,” she says.

Using these methods, each student makes two editions of large accordion-fold books—one for themselves and one to donate to Special Collections in the Denison Library, which houses a collection of artist’s books from around the world, with a focus on American artists in particular.

The theme of Johnson’s book is “Home,” and he used many of the techniques Vogley-Woods demonstrated—some in black and white, some in color—depicting memories of his own home, including drawings of his house and the surrounding woods.

“You have to surrender control,” he says. “You roll on the ink, press the paper, and don’t know what’s going to happen until you see it. It’s a very organic process.”

The exhibition of student-made books is one of four exhibitions built around words and art on view at the Denison Museum until Saturday, May 11. For more info, visit denisonmuseum.org.

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7:02 PM April 8, 2013

A denison student wrote:

What did Johnson learn about himself?

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